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Putting People First

Updated: Mar 18



In my 15+ year communications career, I’ve worked on a broad range of projects and campaigns, from internal communications plans to external thought leadership to media relations and everything in between. With all that variety, there is a single underlying theme: no matter who relays the message, every communication should connect people with information.

It’s not rocket science, but you’d be shocked how often people – you know, those who companies are trying to connect with—become secondary (or even forgotten!). Organizations are so focused on sharing their message that they forget to account for the human beings with rich backstories, desires, and preferences, and they deliver messaging that will almost certainly miss the mark.

As you plan your communications, consider these three tips to help you connect with your audience.

  • Meet people where they are: If you want people to care about your message, start by understanding who they are and what they need. How educated are they on the topic you’re communicating about? How much do they care and why should they care if they don’t already? How do they prefer to consume information? These are essential questions to ask before you write a single sentence.

  • Keep it simple: Even if they’re experts, it’s best to communicate with people in the simplest way possible. Don’t make them think too hard. You’ll lose them instantly. That means staying away from jargon and acronyms and avoiding the dreaded “business speak” whenever possible (which is pretty much always).

  • Use a people lens in everything you do: People want to read about…people. Yes, you want to communicate about a new product or offering, but your audience doesn’t care about what you want. They want to know how your product or offering will make their lives better, remove barriers or challenges they’re facing, and ultimately help them—or the world.

  • Remember, people are your competitive advantage: Many companies are already thinking about people-centric messaging for their customers, but they often forget to do the same for their employees. Employees need to understand a company’s direction and the role they play in this increasingly purpose-focused workforce. Good, employee-centric communications can be another tool in your retention and hiring toolbox, showing employees and applicants you care about them and demonstrating your efforts when it comes to diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Need help making sure you’re creating audience-centric communications that resonate with the real live people who are crucial to your success? The real live people at Tschida Communications are here to help!


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